On Trend Attraction: Pompei, Campania, Italy

Nothing left to do but pray

Nothing left to do but pray

There is much to explore and learn about the community of Pompei and the people who lived and died when their city was swallowed in ash and soot without warning, following an eruption by Mt Vesuvius in AD 79, leaving the town in a perpetual frozen moment.  

Pompei is fascinating and arranging a guide during your visit will enable you to get the most from your Pompei experience, with many tours available ranging from 1 to 6 hours, conducted by local, knowledgeable people.

Fast Facts

Pompeii is in Campania, Italy, not far from Naples.  Its major attraction is the ruined ancient Roman city of the same name, which was engulfed by Mt.Vesuvius in AD 79. This is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Overlooked by Mt Vesuvius

Overlooked by Mt Vesuvius

Romans took control of Pompeii around 200 BC.  On August 24, 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted, burying the nearby town of Pompeii in ash and soot, killing 20,000 people, and preserving the city in its state from that fateful day. Pompeii is an excavation site and outdoor museum of the ancient Roman settlement. 

Green contrast to the bleakness

Green contrast to the bleakness

This site is considered to be one of the few sites where an ancient city has been preserved in detail – everything from jars and tables to paintings and people was frozen in time, yielding, together with neighbouring Herculaneum which suffered the same fate, an unprecedented opportunity to see how the people lived two thousand years ago.

Frozen in time

Frozen in time

Other things to look for when walking around are:
The Ground surface – You will see in the ground there are small tiles called cat’s eyes. The moon’s light or candle light reflects off these tiles and gave light, so people could see where they were walking at night.
Bars and Bakeries – You will walk past where their bars and bakeries once existed. The bars had counters with three to four holes in them. They have water or other beverages available in the holes. The bakeries’ ovens look similar to the old brick stone oven. The House of the Baker has a garden area with millstones of lava used for grinding the wheat.
Street – There are tracks for the carriages in the street for a smoother ride. There are also stone blocks in the street for pedestrians to step onto to cross the street. The sidewalks are higher than the modern sidewalk because the streets had water and waste flowing through them. The stone blocks in the street were also as high as the sidewalk, so people did not walk in the waste and water. The stone blocks were also used for what we now call speed bumps. When the carriages were going through the city, they were going fast. To avoid people from getting splashed by the water and waste they had stone blocks in the street. This would make the driver slow down when they were speeding, so they could get through the blocks.  Extract under fast facts courtesy of Wikitravel.

Street view

Street view

  Googlemaps  

[showmyads]